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01245 Gallery

Choose from 89 pictures in our 01245 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


King of Carnaby Street, Harry Fox, opened his new Lady Jane boutique Featured 01245 Image

King of Carnaby Street, Harry Fox, opened his new Lady Jane boutique

King of Carnaby Street, Harry Fox, opened his new Lady Jane boutique, and was almost immediately arrested. Harry arranged a special window display, with six naked girls to draw attention to his new boutique, crowds soon gathered, but so did the officers of the law, and Harry was arrested for causing an obstruction
Picture taken 28th May 1969

© Mirrorpix

Lined up for the first roll call of their six monthsA¿service at Whittington Barracks Featured 01245 Image

Lined up for the first roll call of their six monthsA¿service at Whittington Barracks

Lined up for the first roll call of their six months?service at Whittington Barracks, these young militiamen do not look as though they are finding it much of an ordeal. This was probably the first complete squad of militiamen in England, for they were on parade by 10:30 am 15th July 1939
The Militiamen were the result of The Military Training Act 1939 which was an Act of Parliament passed by the Conservative administration on 26 May 1939, in a period of international tension that led to World War II. The Act applied to males aged 20 and 21 years old who were to be called up for six months full-time military training, and then transferred to the Reserve. .
Men called up were to be known as militiamen to distinguish them from the regular army. To emphasise this distinction, each man was issued with a suit in addition to a uniform. The intention was for the first intake to undergo six months of basic training before being discharged into an active reserve. They would then be recalled for short training periods and attend annual camps.
There was one registration under the Act, of the first cohort of liable males, on Saturday 3 June 1939, and call-up for these men followed

© Mirrorpix

Some of the Militiamen from Birmingham and the Midlands seen here being issued with their Featured 01245 Image

Some of the Militiamen from Birmingham and the Midlands seen here being issued with their

Some of the Militiamen from Birmingham and the Midlands seen here being issued with their uniforms at Whittington Barracks, Lichfield, this morning, to begin their six months training 15th July 1939
The Militiamen were the result of The Military Training Act 1939 which was an Act of Parliament passed by the Conservative administration on 26 May 1939, in a period of international tension that led to World War II. The Act applied to males aged 20 and 21 years old who were to be called up for six months full-time military training, and then transferred to the Reserve. .
Men called up were to be known as militiamen to distinguish them from the regular army. To emphasise this distinction, each man was issued with a suit in addition to a uniform. The intention was for the first intake to undergo six months of basic training before being discharged into an active reserve. They would then be recalled for short training periods and attend annual camps.
There was one registration under the Act, of the first cohort of liable males, on Saturday 3 June 1939, and call-up for these men followed

© Mirrorpix